Word of the Day

Everything related to this month is settembrino (sait-tehm-bree-noh), because settembrino means “of September” or “related to September.” Italians started using settembrino back in the 18th century, so it’s a relatively young word, at least to Italian standards! There is something …

By Staff

If we think of a recreational activity that speaks of the fall, most of us are likely to mention apple picking. A world of colorful foliage and cerulean skies, crisp air, and Saturday afternoons spent picking the juiciest fruits while …

By Staff

You’re 15, it’s 7 in the morning and time to wake up to go to school: your mother opens your bedroom door shouting “wake up!” If you were in Italy, you’d hear “sveglia!”(sveh-llee-ah), which of course means “wake up,” as …

By Staff

Today’s word opens up a world of possibilities because we use it when talking about …just that: possibilities. Casomai (cah-soh-mah-ee) is the union of two terms, the noun caso (“case,” as in “just in case”) and the adverb mai (“never”). …

By Staff

Waking up to a frosty wonderland is quite usual in October, especially if you are an early bird. It may not be snow’s soft, glistening blanket  — we must wait some more weeks for that — but you may find …

By Staff

This week’s word, rovente (roh-vehn-tai), comes from the Latin rubenten, or “reddish.” However, we don’t quite use it for red stuff, but rather for what’s very, very hot. Non toccare la padella, è rovente! (“Don’t touch that pan, it’s very …

By Staff

Today’s word may be a tad confusing to some, because it has more meanings and all of them are very common — well, besides one, which is probably a favorite only among Dante’s aficionados. Fiera (fee-ai-rah) is mostly used in …

By Staff

Finally, most of us are vaccinated, and old-fashioned colds are no longer as fearful as they’ve been for the past two years. Yes, fall and winter malanni are back. Today’s word is malanno (mah-lahn-noh, plural  mah-lahn-nee), and we translate it …

By Staff

Qualunque (kwah-loon-kwai) is today’s word. In English, you can translate it with many a term, including, “any,” “whatever” or “whichever,” as in sentences like qualunque cosa tu faccia, ti appoggerò (“whatever you do, I’ll support you”), or andare all’università non …

By Staff

We’ve all heard of it, but who actually tasted it? Yes, this may well be the biggest question about cappone(kap-poh-nai), capon in English, our Italian word for today. I, just like many of you I am sure, grew up with …

By Staff