Word of the Day

Today’s word, rinomato(ree-noh-ma-toh) encapsulates the essence of elegance, respect, and high quality. The English equivalents “renowned” or “well-known,” only partially capture its full meaning.  Rinomato is not just about fame or popularity, it’s about a deep-seated respect and recognition of genuine talent …

By Staff

Translating a word from one language to another is not always straightforward. An example of it is today’s word, sfogarsi (sfoh-gahr-see). Rooted in the Italian word for “ardor” or “passion” (foga), sfogarsi appeared in our language in the 14th century and it is commonly …

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 In the realm of language, few words possess the nuanced grace of our word of the day, insinuare (een-see-noo-ah-rai), which we translate in English as “to insinuate” or “to suggest.” This verb traces its origins back to the Latin verb insinuo,  meaning “to introduce” …

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Today’s word is indeed very common and you can hear it dappertutto! Dappertutto (dahp-pair-toot-toh) is a delightful term that’s as fun to say as it is to use. It’s an adverb that means “everywhere” or “in every place.” The word is a compound …

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Today’s word is grigliata(greel-lyee-ah-tah). Grigliata refers to a method of roasting where food is placed on a grill, suspended over embers, an electric coil, or gas burners: in simpler words, Italy’s grigliata is the world’s barbeque! The term itself derives from the Italian …

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The Italian verb rafforzare (rahf-fohr-tsah-rai) comes from the union of the prefix “ra-“, which indicates repetition or reinforcement, and the root noun forza. The latter, in turn, comes from the Latin adjective fortis, which gave the late Latin noun fortia. Rafforzare was used for the first time in …

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Cavarsela  (cah-vahr-sai-lah)– is a delightful Italian expression, brimming with nuances and subtle connotations. Its strictest meaning is about making it through tough circumstances, not necessarily unscathed, but certainly undeterred. In English, we can translate it with “getting away with,” “getting …

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The Italian word sfogarsi (sfoh-gahr-see) carries a pretty deep emotional meaning because, in the realm of emotions and psychology, the act of sfogarsi plays a vital role in interpersonal relationships and self-care.  The verb sfogarsi comes from the noun sfogo, meaning “relief” or “outlet,” and it encompasses …

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Today’s word, sottosopra (soht-toh-soh-pra) has never been so popular!  Sottosopra translates with “upside down” and it is the way Italians call the terrifying alternative universe of an incredibly popular Netflix series set in the 1980s — I am sure I need to …

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Altrimenti(al-tree-mehn-tee)is a commonly used adverb in Italian, formed by combining the adjective altro, which means “other,” with the suffix –mente, which in Italian is used to form adverbs. The word altrimenti is typically translated into English as “or” or “otherwise,” …

By Staff

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