Life + Style

You are ELIGIBLE to sign up for Medicare when you turn 65 years of age – or for those under 65 and on Disability for 24 months – or as a Foreign National, a lawfully admitted alien (green card) living …

Up to the second post-war period, Italy was a largely rural country, with an economy rooted in agriculture and a lifestyle that had remained virtually unchanged for centuries for the vast majority of its citizens.  Since then, however, things changed …

If you don’t know how to use it, you don’t know how to translate it. There is a lot of truth in these words, especially for terms like figurati (fee-goo-rah-tee), whose actual meaning has nothing to do with its etymology and …

By Staff

Happy Epifania to you all! While the rest of the world says goodbye to the holiday season on the 1st of January, Italy likes to hold on to the festive atmosphere a few days longer, officially bringing the Christmas period …

By Staff

After this necessary preamble, let us look at this week’s word, the Italian for New Year, more closely. For those familiar with the language, its etymology is clear: Capodanno comes from capo d’anno, the literal “head of the (new) year.” …

By Staff

Happy Christmas, Buon Natale a tutti!  Festivities, even in this dreadful Covid-19 climate, remain a time to think positive and smile. And is there a better way to celebrate that making a toast? In English, we use the word cheers, …

By Staff

Piedmontese have two favorite chocolates: one, gianduiotto, is sweet, charming and dressed in gold, always, almost to show its royal origins in the city of the Savoias, Turin. The other is probably not as known around the world, but just …

Indovina (een-doh-vee-nah) comes from the word indovinare, which means to guess. This little verb of ours is worthy of some more discussion. It comes from the vulgar Latin indivinare and, through it, from the Latin divinare, to foretell. So, indovinare …

By Staff

We all use it, but where does it come from, really? And how should we translate it into English? These are the two, most pressing questions associated with our expression of the day, alla faccia (ahl-la fah-tcha). According to our …

By Staff

Intanto (een-tahn-toh), il nuovo anno è incominciato. This little sentence is perfect to explain how our word of the day works. Let’s see why.  You can translate the sentence above in two different ways, based on the meaning you decide …

By Staff