Word of the Day

The word arzillo is an adjective used to describe someone as lively, spry, or vigorous, often implying a surprising level of energy despite age or expectations. It conveys a sense of being spirited and active, and it’s frequently used to …

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The Italian expression per di più (pair dee peeoo) is typically used to introduce additional information, emphasizing that it supports or enhances the previous statement.  In English, per di più can be translated in several ways, depending on the context, …

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The Italian word peraltro (per-ahl-troh) is an adverb that translates to “what’s more,” “moreover,” “besides,” or “furthermore” in English. It’s used to add information that emphasizes what has already been mentioned, or to highlight a point already made; for example, it can …

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Today’s word, impeccabile (eem-pek-kah-bee-lai) is something you want to be associated with anything you do. It comes from the Latin impeccabilis, which combines the prefix “in-” (meaning “not”) with peccare (meaning “to sin” or “to make a mistake”). Thus, its …

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Today’s word, raffinato(rahf-fee-nah-toh) truly embodies elegance, sophistication, and a touch of luxury.  Raffinato was first attested as an adjective (so it has a feminine and plural form, too) in the 16th century, and comes from the Italian verb raffinare, which …

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As with many other words in the Bella Lingua, it too derives from Latin, more specifically from the neuter noun insigne and, even more precisely, from its plural insignia, which meant “banner,” just like in Italian, but also “badge.” The …

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Cartapesta (kar-tah peh-stah) means papier-mâché in English and, with coriandoli and maschera is the most quintessential of all Carnevale words. It comes from the union of carta (paper) and pesta (pounded), which reveals what it is: a concoction of paper …

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The Italian word botti (boht-tee, singular botto) carries an aura of mystery in its etymology. Its meaning, denoting a sharp blow or crack, leads us to consider its possible connection to another Italian word, botta, a term rooted in the …

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The word qualunque (kwa-loon-kwai) has a rich and intriguing linguistic journey. It comes from the Latin qualiscumque, a combination of qualis (meaning “what kind of”) and cumque (meaning “whichever” or “any”), which is Italian gave qual(e) and the suffix -unque, a common method in our language for creating words that express …

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Our word of the day, cogliere (koh-lleeai-reh) has a versatile range of uses and variations in meaning, rooted in its origin and etymology. Its broad spectrum of applications in the Italian language shows how adaptable it is in many different contexts!  Cogliere comes …

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