Life + Style

Speranza (spe-rahn-zah), what a beautiful word. It means  “hope” and  it comes from  the Latin  spes, a noun of the fifth declension, one that kids in school never managed to remember.  Before being “speranza,” it was speme in Italian and, …

By Staff

If you translate literally non vedo l’ora (noh-n vai-doh l’oh-rah), it doesn’t make much sense. What could “not being able to see the time” possibly mean? Well, we don’t use it with that meaning, really.  Non vedo l’ora is the …

By Staff

Traveling for real may be  difficult right now, but nothing says we can’t travel with our minds or  preparing for our next trip somehow. To do both at once, I thought it may be nice to take an ideal taxi …

When transatlantic air travel resumes, the fishing village Sciacca might be the ideal base for trips into the interior and along the coastline of stunning Sicily. But even as the Covid-19 pandemic eases, the village is noteworthy for another reason: …

Vittoria (Vit-toh-ree-ah) is one of those words you recognize in all languages. Victory in English, victoire in French, victoria in Spanish, never mind where you come from in the world, its sound and meaning is understood.  The first to use …

By Staff

If there is one thing people have been showing these days, that’d be coraggio (coh-rah-djoh). Its meaning is simple, because the Italian sounds and looks a lot like the English courage, which is exactly what it means.  Coraggio comes from …

By Staff

Allegria! (Ahl-lai-gree-ah) means fun, gaiety, cheerfulness. Italians are known to be gente allegra, cheerful people, and it shows especially in hard times such as these.  The history of the word is somehow uncommon — or at least it is, when  …

By Staff

“Via Montenapoleone, il salotto di  Milano, ritrovo delle signore dell’élite della città.” It was 1954 when Dutch born singer Peter Van Wood sang his ode to the beating heart of Milan, the  spine of what was already the centre of …

I wonder how many people are familiar with the Italian word fervore ( fair-voh-reh), easily recognizable as the English “fervor.” Fervore comes from the Latin fervor-fervoris, which means heat. The old Latin verb from which is derived,  fervere, still exists …

By Staff

As “resta a casa” mandates and travel bans continue to be the new normal, many of us have found extra time to daydream, to get lost in thoughts that whisk us away from reality. For me, those dreams often center …