varinia cappelletti

Spelt, known to the ancient Romans as far, used to be their most common and best loved cereal up to the first republican period (509-264 BC). After, wheat took its place because of its better yield and lower labor costs.   …

Summer gives us large quantities of marvelous fresh vegetables, but what about the winter? As the saying goes, necessity is mother of all inventions, so giardiniera was born.  Carrots, celery, cucumbers, cauliflowers, zucchini, bell peppers, all chopped, lightly boiled and …

Burrata was born in Apulia, more precisely in Andria, almost by chance: and thanks for that!  We were in the mid-1950s when, because of a heavy snowfall, Lorenzo Bianchino couldn’t go and sell his milk so, in an attempt not …

Pecorino Romano: the ancient cheese with the “cappa nera” While they praised the “vigor” of this cheese “made from sheep milk,” which was also part of Roman soldiers’ diet, neither Homer nor Virgil would have thought it could become this …

Up to 1963 the proud region of Abruzzo was not a region in its own right, but cohabited with Molise, even if Frederick of Swabia had already, in 1233, created the Giustiziere d’Abruzzo, identifying the region’s territory.   Abruzzo became …

Valle d’Aosta: “heaven for men, purgatory for women, hell for mules,” but certainly delicious for our palates! Among mountains and castles, up there, in the western-most corner of Italy, the smallest of regions, Valle d’Aosta, winks at us. Stern and …

Chinotto is a citrus fruit originally from China, exclusively grown on the Ligurian coast, in the Savona area since the end of the 19th century. These small, uniquely fragrant fruits, used to be sold candied and preserved in maraschino, after …

Let’s be honest, it’s not only kids who love chocolate eggs: we all do! Indeed, the egg has a very ancient symbolism: it always represented life, the fulcrum of universal elements, both in pagan and Christian traditions.   Easter egg tradition …

Symbol of Naples’ patisserie, the babbà has very peculiar and, indeed, ancient origins! It reached Naples from Paris, city were the chefs of bourgeois families were usually sent to improve their culinary skills. But Parisians didn’t invent it because, according …

…Here it is, in all its “thickness,” the bistecca alla Fiorentina! “and you know what — they say in Florence — outside of Tuscany, they don’t even know how to cut it. It’s thin, without fillet… look at those boneless …