The crunch from Turin Napoleon was crazy about!

Grissini are one of Turin's most famous delicacies

We all know it: in Italy, we love bread! These very crunchy “bread sticks” were invented in Turin in 1679, by the Savoias’ personal baker, who created them appositely for king Vittorio Amedeo II, who couldn’t digest regular bread very well.  

Grissini, or Traditional Italian Bread Sticks, originated in Torino in Piemonte


Their dough is the same as bread’s but, as they are very thin, they dry while baking and remain crunchy. Grissini were an immediate success because they were not only good to eat and easy to digest, but also lasted longer than regular bread; so famous that they became “les petits bâtons de Turin,” as Napoleon would call them, turned into a local speciality.

They are great accompanied by classic antipasti such as olives, cheese, and cured meats


Those first grissini - called “robatà,” between 40 and 80 cm in length, irregular in shape and rolled by hand -  are today a prodotto agroalimentare Italiano protetto (Italian agri-food protected product). Later, the grissini stirati were invented, the mechanical production of which started as early as the 18th century.  

You can eat rolled in some prosciutto for a quick aperitivo


Today, we can enjoy herbs grissini, spice grissini, olive oil grissini, all of which should be enjoyed with local cold cuts, prosciutto and soft cheeses, such as goat’s.  
 

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