Chinotto: a fully Italian vintage soda

Chinotto is a citrus fruit originally from China, exclusively grown on the Ligurian coast

Chinotto is a citrus fruit originally from China, exclusively grown on the Ligurian coast, in the Savona area since the end of the 19th century.   

Chinotto is a citrus fruit originally from China, exclusively grown on the Ligurian coast


These small, uniquely fragrant fruits, used to be sold candied and preserved in maraschino, after having been kept under a sea water brine for some time. At the beginning of the 1930s, the first chinotto soda appeared: it was produced by San Pellegrino, but its real inventor remains a mystery.   

Chinotto enjoyed great popularity until the 1960s, only to be almost forgotten until the dawn of the new Millenium, when he had a new lease of life and found its way into many a popular cocktail. Chinotto’s bottles are usually pleasantly retro in style, and we all pretty much remember them behind the counter of our dairy shops and local café, more than behind that of some fancy bar.  

Chinotto’s bottles are usually pleasantly retro in style. Photo: flickr.com/photos/avlxyz/


Thirst-quenching and mildly sparkling, delicately bitter and, above all, impossible to copy, in 2012 chinotto risked to be taxed by the Italian Government, which wanted to classify it as a “sparkling soda with sugar.” Luckily common sense, or even better, good flavor, won in this occasion!

Since 2004, chinotto fruits are protected by a Presidio Slow Food


Since 2004, chinotto fruits are protected by a Presidio Slow Food. The only company producing chinotto sodas with the real citrus fruits protected by the Presidio is Piedmontese Lurisia, which makes its chinotto with thermal waters.

Receive More Stories Like This In Your Inbox

SPONSORED

Recommended

The myth of Leonardo da Vinci: five hundred years of mystery and geniality

This, more than any other before, is the year of Leonardo da Vinci, as we celebrate the 500th anniversary of his death, which took place in Amboise (...

Italy and its top destinations shine at the 2019 New York Times’ Travel Show

Cooking for new destinations to visit or places to return to this year? The New York Times Travel Show has set the 2019 trends for globetrotters by...

Is Italy ready to stop cooking?

When it comes to food, Italy remains traditional to its core. Don’t get me wrong: the country has long embraced international cuisine and has...

Italy’s own “Willy Wonka”

CREATIVE/ENGAGING TITLE NEEDED!!! Italy’s own “Willy Wonka”, Michele Ferrara created Nutella … he also created which of the following??? Italy’s own...

Get healthy with Nonna: traditional Italian remedies for everyday’s ailments

When your grandparents bring you up, getting cured with peculiar medical remedies is as natural as getting double portions on your dinner plate...

Weekly in Italian

Recent Issues