Corno di Capra, the Italian heirloom variety of pepper

Corno di Capra peppers

Corno di Capra peppers

When it comes to peppers, we all know the basics: bell peppers are sweet, habaneros are extremely hot, some are good fresh, some are better dried. But have you ever heard of a sweet pepper called “Corno di Capra”?

The name literally means “goat horn” in Italian and, if you look at it, you can see why: this Italian heirloom variety of pepper, with its curved and pointy shape, looks just like a little horn and comes in two colors, green and red.

Due to their round flavor, Corno di Capra sweet peppers are delicious both fresh and dried and can be used in a multitude of ways to compliment many dishes.

In Campania, they are usually slow roasted or pan fried and served right away, or, in alternative, they are dried and used as a snack, as if they were chips – only much healthier and definitely more flavorful! 

In Apulia, they are served sautéed in olive oil and garlic to accompany fried eggs and plump black olives: simple, flavorful and  perfect for any time of the day.

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