A Winter Citrus Chill

Winter Citrus Chill, Cappelletti Sorbetto, Italian Drink, Italian culture, Italian heritage, Italian american, Italian news, Italian traditions

Ruby Red Grapefruit and Cappelletti Sorbetto

 

It’s time to enjoy one of the glories of the cold weather table, winter citrus. Huge orbs of Ruby Red grapefruit, bright orange Cara Cara navel oranges, and smooth skinned Meyer lemons with their peppery tartness are winter’s seasonal jewels. These fruits accent the table, bringing a dash of color and flavor contrast to antipasti and primi. Made into mostarda they complement roasted meats.  
 
Add lemon juice and lemon zest to your next batch of risotto for a new take on one of Italy’s most famous dishes. Citrus can make an appearance at any point in an Italian meal. Here is a trio of fresh and boldly flavored sorbetti, churned Italian ices.
 
Sorbetti are simple mixes of sweetened seasonal fruit or fruit juice. Often a dash of fine sea salt and lemon juice are added to balance flavor. A raw egg white can be used to lighten and smooth the mixture, increasing volume by about 25%. The white also acts as a preservative, imparting a pleasing texture and preventing iciness.
 
When using raw eggs the CDC recommends pasteurized eggs to eliminate any possibility of salmonella contamination. Pasteurized eggs, such as Davidson’s Safest Choice Eggs (safeeggs.com) are widely available.
 
Ruby Red grapefruit, sumptuous and semi-sweet, make a wonderfully vibrant sorbetto. More flavorful than their white or pink-fleshed cousins, they are a delight with Italian aperitivi like Aperol, Campari, Cappelletti or Cocchi  Americano Rosa. Meyer lemons, a cross between lemons and mandarins have a clean tang that makes them a refreshing choice for a mealtime intermezzo, while sweet Cara Cara oranges, sporting notes of roses and berries, make a lush sorbetto with a rich orange flavor, a perfect end to any meal. 
 
Ruby Red Grapefruit and Cappelletti Sorbetto
makes a generous 1¼ quarts
To heighten the flavor, dribble a bit of Cappelletti over the sorbetto once it is scooped into serving coupes.
• 3 cups freshly squeezed red grapefruit juice
• ¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon light corn syrup
• 3-4 tablespoons vanilla sugar
• Pinch of fine sea salt
• 1 pasteurized egg white
• 3 tablespoons Cappelletti
 
Combine the red grapefruit juice, corn syrup, vanilla sugar, and salt in a medium bowl. Stir well, adding an extra tablespoon of vanilla sugar, if desired. Transfer the base to a non-reactive container, and refrigerate 8 hours or overnight. Lightly beat the pasteurized egg white. Pour the red grapefruit base and beaten egg white into an ice cream machine, and churn according to the manufacturer’s directions. After the mixture has churned 20 minutes, add the Cappelletti, and finish churning. Pack the sorbetto into a freezer container. Cover and freeze 4 hours to cure.
 
Meyer Lemon Sorbetto
makes 1 quart
For even fresher flavor, garnish with a few tiny leaves of basil or serve with a glass of Prosecco.
• 1 cup water
• 1 cup vanilla sugar
• zest of 2 Meyer lemons
• 2 cups Meyer lemon juice
• ½ cup light corn syrup
• pinch of fine sea salt
 
Combine the water, vanilla sugar, and lemon zest in a small saucepan and place over a medium flame. Stir until the sugar has dissolved completely. Remove from the flame, and strain and discard zest. Add the Meyer lemon juice, corn syrup and salt. Combine well. Transfer the base to a non-reactive container, cover and refrigerate 8 hours or overnight. Transfer the mixture to an ice cream machine, and freeze according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Pack the sorbetto into a freezer container, cover and freeze 4 hours to cure. If the sorbetto is too firm to scoop right from the freezer, leave it on the counter for 10 minutes to soften.
 
Cara Cara Sorbetto
makes a generous 1¼  quarts
If you can’t find any Cara Cara oranges, you may substitute any variety of blood orange. You may have to increase the sugar slightly. Taste before churning.
• 3 cups freshly squeezed Cara Cara Orange juice
• 1 tablespoon Cara Cara zest
• ¾ cup vanilla sugar
• Pinch of fine sea salt
• 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
• 1 pasteurized egg white
 
Combine 1 cup of Cara Cara orange juice, the zest and ¾ cup of vanilla sugar in a small saucepan. Place over a medium flame, and stir until the sugar has completely dissolved. Remove from the heat. Strain and discard the zest. Add the remaining 2 cups of juice, lemon juice, and salt, and stir well. Transfer the base to a non-reactive container. Cover and refrigerate 8 hours or overnight. Lightly beat the pasteurized egg white. Pour the Cara Cara base and beaten egg white into an ice cream machine, and churn according to the manufacturer’s directions. Pack the sorbetto into a freezer container. Cover and freeze 4 hours to cure.
 
Note: Vanilla sugar is granulated white sugar combined with the tiny seeds contained within the vanilla bean. To make it, place 1 pound of granulated sugar in a resealable container. With a paring knife slit a vanilla bean open lengthwise. Use the dull edge of the knife to scrape the seeds out. Combine them with the sugar, and add the bean. Close tightly and set aside 1 week to allow the sugar to take up the vanilla flavor.
 
Questions? Email me at adri@AdriBarrCrocetti.com or visit AdriBarrCrocetti.com

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