Bottarga: caviar made in Italy

Bottarga is nothing more than the dried and naturally processed eggs of tuna fish and mullet. It is an exceptionally delicious product, rich in proteins, typical of Sardinia, Sicily and of the southern area of Maremma, near Orbetello. As it often happens with Italian delicacies, its origins lie deep in ancient history. Even though the name itself, “bottarga,” comes from the Arabicbatarikh” (used to indicate salted fish eggs),  it was probably the Phoenicians who made it known in the Mediterranean 

Bottarga is the Italian name for a delicacy of salted, cured fish roe, typically of the grey mullet or the bluefin tuna

Sicily produces red tuna bottarga and yellow fin tuna bottarga. Favignana red tuna is the most exquisite, flavorsome variety and can weight over 100 kg. Thanks to its deliciousness, it is included in the list of Sicily’s traditional food and agriculture products.  

Spaghetti with Bottarga, a quick and tasty dish for any time of the year

However yellow fin tuna, of lower quality and weight, is used much more.  

Risotto with bottarga

Sardinia is specialized in the production of mullet bottarga, the most famous variety coming from the Stagno Cabras area, a place known for its biodiversity 

Spaghetti with Bottarga, a quick and tasty dish for any time of the year

The eggs are washed, salted and stirred every day, then pressed and let mature.  

Bottarga can be grated on spaghetti, just as one does with parmigiano, or thinly sliced and served on crostini, with a drop of olive oil

 

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